kaiami:

I get a ton of asks about more examples of my handwriting so.

This is a notebook that I used last year with some notes from a couple classes.

1 week ago via bl0ndeinlaw ( source kaiami ) with 3,100 notes

studyundersun:

Back to School To-Do List for College Students

collegegrindorg:


Accept the scholarships and loans you’ve been awarded right away. Make sure you’re on top of all your finances to prevent some seriously scary stuff from happening…like not being able to enroll in school or having monsters replace your parents.

Application processes suck- especially for scholarships. They take long, they’re tedious, and they’re hard to win, so try to get a lot of them out of the way while you have some extra time before school starts. Let’s face it – you need the money. 

Be ready to send off your resume when opportunity knocks. There will be reps at career fairs looking to be impressed, honors programs to apply to, and spontaneous job openings to jab at.  When these opportunities come your way, you’ll be glad that your skills and experiences are all effectively listed out.

Make the most of your time and actually do something with your life.  Create short and long term goals to stay focused, and stick to ‘em.

Save yourself from an identity crisis during the school year and dig deep now. Reflect upon your choices and confront the dreaded questions. Are you on the path you want to be on? That you should be on? 

Familiarize yourself with the course material and the professor (www.ratemyprofessor.com).  Knowing what the teacher expects and understanding class objectives will help guide you throughout the quarter or semester.

To look at them, you gotta have them. So this means compile a list of all the books you need from each class and search long and hard for good deals on them online.  Your university bookstore rips you off. Do yourself a favor and buy used or even rent from Amazon. Take note that your professors may not use every book listed on the syllabus, but don’t let that stop you from getting acquainted with the material beforehand so you’re not lost or overwhelmed when classes start.

It’s their job to help you when you need them, but it’s your job to seek them out. They’re usually useless and pretty nonexistent if you don’t actively reach out to them.  Get ahead and start to build a relationship with them so they can write you an authentic letter of recommendation when you need one.  And also share where you’re at with them.  They may be able to provide some helpful insight and open unknown doors for you!

See what opportunities and resources you can take advantage of! Many freshmen (+others) come into school without being aware of all the things they can do, so help yourself get the most out of your college experience by checking out what programs, scholarships, study abroad programs, honors seminars, etc. you are eligible for.  If you don’t know where to start, chat it up with your advisor.

First, look at your university’s calendar of events and mark it all on your own. Then go back in and pencil in the classes you’re taking, any trips you have planned, events to attend, and deadlines to meet.  Good planning is a way to keep your sanity.

I’m sure you’re aware, but it is just so easy to spend money. Make a budget for how much you want to spend on food, books, events, gifts, etc. and make sure you stick to the allotted amount each month.  It also helps to keep a log of your purchases to see just how much money is flowin’ outta your pocket.

Finally get around to writing down all your accounts and passwords, cleaning out your receipts, scraping out the random junk that sank to the bottom of your bag, organizing your huge stack of papers, and actually knowing where things are.

Do you really need that Twitter account to indirectly tweet about your bitchy friend, that Instagram to show off the latest sandwich you’re eating or even that Facebook friend who just drags you down with her ridiculous posts? Social media can be a powerful tool, but don’t let it hold you back.

Clean out your closet, drawers, bags, life! Get rid of any extra baggage you have, sell it for petty cash, and feel a whole lot lighter (and richer.)

Learn to do all the things you left up to your parents before. Do the laundry, go to the post, cook something other than instant ramen, pay your credit cards, make doctors appointments, take your vitamins, go potty.

Learn to care about what you’re putting in your body.  Train your taste buds to crave quality stuff, but also know how to treat yourself once in a while.  Cook a lot of your own meals to control your choices and portions, and find a healthy balance in your life to be able to give your body what it needs while still being able to enjoy life.  Don’t do crash diets or crazy binges. Find a balance, and both your body and mind will thank you.

It is so extremely important that your body can keep up with you.  College can make sitting down in a chair and looking at a book or a computer for hours on end seem normal, but keeping in shape is your responsibility and is in your best interest. Studies have shown that exercise can help your brain function better, so help yourself out! Create a fitness routine that works for you- one that you can stick with. Along with a countless number of other benefits, you’ll be glad you did when an opportunity to study abroad in Greece opens up for you.

Keep in touch with your loved ones and restore the golden art of handwritten letters.  College is a time where we can really see who our true friends are by the efforts that are made, so do your part in maintaining relationships with good communication.  A meaningful letter or a cute package can go a long way.

Get to know the stranger (or friend) who is now your roommate for the upcoming year.  It’s no easy task sharing a small space with someone else so make sure you take the time to lay out boundaries and expectations. Make sure you clearly address any problems you may have with certain behavior (having boys over, talking on the phone, etc.) and compromise to make your dorm a comfortable and safe space for the both of you.  The last thing you want is to stress yourself out with living conditions when you have plenty other college stuff to worry about.

Do what you gotta do to love yourself.  A healthy amount of self-respect will serve you well in everything that you do.  Knowing who you are and being comfortable with it will help you make good decisions and live a generally fulfilling life.  You deserve nothing short of that.

Anonymous: Hey I was just wondering where you typically get your school supplies and what you need going into high school as a freshman. Thanks (:

work-hard-and-smart:

studyingstudent:

My Favorite Places to Shop

  1. Target
  2. Office Depot
  3. Walmart 
  4. Sam’s Club

Here was my school supply list from last year: 

The Basics

  1. Pencils. I always get good mechanical pencils at the beginning of the year. If I don’t lose them (unlikely) they last me all year. 
  2. Pens (Blue/Black/Red)
  3. Highlighters (these are my favorite) 
  4. Binders. I got my binders from Target and I’m obsessed with them. 
  5. Notebooks. I usually get college ruled Five Star notebooks. I love the five subject notebooks because they are easy to organize. (I do a tab for each quarter and then vocabulary in the back.) 
  6. Notecards (Lined) 
  7. Loose-leaf paper. College ruled!
  8. Backpack. Last year I got an Under Armour backpack and I loved it! This year, however, I am going to get this adorable north face backpack. Whatever you decide to get, make sure you have plenty of room. Although cute backpacks are pretty, most of them aren’t functional at all. (Unfortunately.) Choose wisely. 

Extra

These aren’t necessary but they make school more enjoyable, at least for me!

  1. Planner. If I didn’t have a planner, I would be completely lost! They are hard to get the hang of at first, but it will become an extremely beneficial habit. 
  2. Gum/Mints. This is crucial. I pop a piece of gum in when I need to focus, and it may be superstition but mints help me think!
  3. Headphones. Headphones are controversial- some teachers don’t allow them in the classroom. I don’t recommend wearing them when a teacher is lecturing, but if you are given time to work, they do help you get in the zone. I use them to utilize that work time in class, because if I don’t, I find myself joining conversation and end up getting nothing done. 
  4. Colorful pens. It’s hard enough all ready for me to motivate myself to study, and even harder if my notes are ugly! These are my absolute favorite. 
  5. Post-it notes. I use post it notes constantly. I have an obsession. 
  6. Flash drive. 
  7. Water bottle. My school doesn’t have A/C, adding to the already hell-like atmosphere. Cool. However, it’s important to drink a lot of water, so I always carry a water bottle! These are my babies: here & here. The bigger the better- you won’t have to leave class to fill up as often!

american apparel has amazing durable backpacks too!!

fuckyeahstudyblog:

? How to learn a language ? 

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: 12 mental benefits of exercise.

Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

breatheinandbreathout-andstudy:

Study like Spencer Hastings:

  • Research: Read books, read journals, search online articles and publications, etc, perform field studies, question everything.
  • Study with friends: Quiz your friends, tutor courses you’re good at, work in groups and help each other with assignments.
  • Stay organized: File your papers, color-code, organized chaos always.
  • Friendly competition: Motivate yourself, join competitions, try not to fight with your sister, remember to encourage and respect your peers.
  • Get involved: Sports, debate, language, school productions, writing etc. Participate in anything that showcases your skills and talent.
  • Ask for help: Talk to your teachers/profs, get to know your school services, and you can always make an appointment with a local psychologist (before things spiral out of hand..)
  • Don’t speedJust don’t do it
  • Stay interested and explore your options: Attend campus tours or events, volunteer, stay connected to peers from different areas, network, apply to more than one option (be it schools, scholarships etc.)  
  • Caffeinate, but remember to hydrate. Coffee, coffee, redbull, coffee, tea, coffee, sometimes water. 
  • Sleepwhat is sleep?

How To Study

hastag-med-school:

Some people don’t know what “studying” means or don’t know how to study because there’s not really a precise definition. Here’s a general overview of how to study which will help you get those grades in class!

1. Take good notes from class. Even if you don’t “feel the need” to write anything down, at least write down the outline of what you’re learning in class. That way, studying will be way easier. Studying is basically reading your notes and understanding information.

2. Read the textbook chapters and pages assigned to you by your professor. Make sure you get a really good idea of what you’re learning.

3. If there is math or science involved, make sure you work through practice problems until you memorize and understand how the process of the problem solving works.

4. Make sure you understand the textbook chapters and things learned in class FULLY. Ask your teachers/friends any question you may have.

Some helpful links I found, and they all open in a new page!!

—-

Top Ten Tips for First Year University Students

Budgeting Tips in Post-Secondary Schools

Assignment Calculator // helps break down your assignment into steps!!

Some General Help for Exams/Note Taking/Researching/etc.

Top Ten Tips to be Successful in University

Cosmo on Campus

Managing Your Study Time

1 month ago via xxxxrxxxx ( source luxurae ) with 36,789 notes

10 Things You Should Know About a School Before Applying

collegeapp-chick:

1. It’s official name and how it’s spelled.

You don’t want to mess that up on rec envelopes or on your supplement essay. For example, it’s William & Mary, not William and Mary.
And yes, there’s a difference. Don’t be that kid who spells Wesleyan Weslyan.

2. How many students attend?

What are you getting into? Is this a massive metropolis, or a tiny village smaller than your high school? This is important, so think about it.

3. What are its colors, and what is its mascot?

Also if it matters to you, what sports are big?
You’re going to be wearing a lot of their colors, so make sure you know those little details as well as the bigger stats.

4. What are the core requirements like?

Read More

HW